Crataegus (Hawthorn)

Forum for discussion of Evergreen bonsai – Buxus, Cotoneaster, Olive etc.

Crataegus (Hawthorn)

Postby SueBee » November 9th, 2017, 10:10 am

I have just found an interesting Hawthorn seedling in my garden. The trunk is bent in two directions and I hope will eventually make an interesting Bonsai.What I need to know is what to do next - it about 40cm high at the moment. Should I leave it grow? Trim it? or dig, root prune and replant? or pot it now? I have put a pic of it in my album along with one of the root direction but they loaded sideways.
Thanks for Sharing
SueBee

If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Marcus Tullius Cicero
SueBee
Aussie Bonsai Fan
Aussie Bonsai Fan
 
Posts: 85
Images: 35
Joined: November 7th, 2017, 11:54 am
Location: South Western Victoria
Favorite Species: Maple
Bonsai Age: 2
Bonsai Club: Always Learning via Net, Reading & practice.

Re: Crataegus (Hawthorn)

Postby Watto » November 9th, 2017, 4:47 pm

Hi Sue,
I didn't say hello before, so welcome and I hope you enjoy your experiences.
I love to dig hawthorn and the best time is late August. The tree shown could do with a bit more growing on to give it some thickness in the trunk. Just let it grow as much as it likes until you decide its time for it to become part of your collection.
It is probably best if you could post a photo with your question/story to save everyone going to your gallery, just for the sake of ease. I think there are some "instructions" in wiki that may help you.
Cheers
Watto
Watto
Aussie Bonsai Fan
Aussie Bonsai Fan
 
Posts: 2297
Joined: July 6th, 2009, 8:17 am
Location: Goulburn
Favorite Species: Plum
Bonsai Age:
Bonsai Club: Goulburn Bonsai Society

Re: Crataegus (Hawthorn)

Postby shibui » November 9th, 2017, 6:23 pm

I agree with all Watto has written. Early spring seems to be a good time to transplant hawthorn for me too.

When letting a tree grow freely in the ground just check every now and then to make sure the strong leader does not overpower the lower growth or that a lower sucker does not take off and grow too big.
shibui
Aussie Bonsai Fan
Aussie Bonsai Fan
 
Posts: 4311
Images: 24
Joined: August 22nd, 2009, 8:41 pm
Location: Yackandandah
Favorite Species: trident maple
Bonsai Age: 33
Bonsai Club: Albury/Wodonga; BSV; Canberra; VNBC

Re: Crataegus (Hawthorn)

Postby SueBee » November 10th, 2017, 11:57 am

Thank you both for the comments, I will leave it in ground for a couple of years and see what eventuates.
Thanks for Sharing
SueBee

If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Marcus Tullius Cicero
SueBee
Aussie Bonsai Fan
Aussie Bonsai Fan
 
Posts: 85
Images: 35
Joined: November 7th, 2017, 11:54 am
Location: South Western Victoria
Favorite Species: Maple
Bonsai Age: 2
Bonsai Club: Always Learning via Net, Reading & practice.

Re: Crataegus (Hawthorn)

Postby SueBee » November 18th, 2017, 7:19 am

A local farmer has given me access to some Hawthorns on his land but tells me they are hard to transplant. Does anyone know if this is the case? I do not want to kill it in the moving as it will be both hard work and a waste of his tree. I do plan to wait for winter to transplant. Thought I might begin by ringing it down to shovel depth to cut roots and then leave it till winter to let feeders grow- a good idea or not?
Thanks for Sharing
SueBee

If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Marcus Tullius Cicero
SueBee
Aussie Bonsai Fan
Aussie Bonsai Fan
 
Posts: 85
Images: 35
Joined: November 7th, 2017, 11:54 am
Location: South Western Victoria
Favorite Species: Maple
Bonsai Age: 2
Bonsai Club: Always Learning via Net, Reading & practice.

Re: Crataegus (Hawthorn)

Postby shibui » November 18th, 2017, 12:09 pm

I have transplanted a few smaller hawthorns but have not tackled larger ones yet. The ones I have dug have survived. Watto will probably give the best advice.
Cutting the roots with a shovel is an accepted way of promoting feeder roots. The problem I find is that the roots are cut too far out from the trunk so after collecting I need to shorten roots further to get it into a pot. Probably a better idea to work out what size pot you intend to use, mark that diameter out around the trunk and cut a bit inside the line.

Killing a hawthorn is not the end of the world. They are a weed and most land managers would be glad to see them gone. Many get killed if we don't collect them and you will have learnt some valuable things in the attempt even if it proves unsuccessful.
shibui
Aussie Bonsai Fan
Aussie Bonsai Fan
 
Posts: 4311
Images: 24
Joined: August 22nd, 2009, 8:41 pm
Location: Yackandandah
Favorite Species: trident maple
Bonsai Age: 33
Bonsai Club: Albury/Wodonga; BSV; Canberra; VNBC

Re: Crataegus (Hawthorn)

Postby peterb » November 19th, 2017, 2:46 pm

Hi Suebee
I've collected a few bigger hawthorns here around adelaide, I killed a few and then a friend of mine said that he collects them as soon as the leaves have dropped. He said he was having close to 100% success. I've tried it on 3 now and all have survived. You might give that a go
Cheers
Peterb
User avatar
peterb
Aussie Bonsai Fan
Aussie Bonsai Fan
 
Posts: 689
Joined: October 4th, 2011, 5:09 pm
Location: adelaide
Favorite Species: olive
Bonsai Age: 5

Re: Crataegus (Hawthorn)

Postby Watto » November 20th, 2017, 8:04 am

In my experience hawthorns are not the easiest trees to dig but they are certainly rewarding. In comparison with Elm, Privet or Maple they are more difficult, but in about the same range as plums, but easier than most Australian natives.
A few things that have work is when you dig try to get then in the smallest training pot you can (within reason of course) but they appear not to do so well when over-potted. In our area we try to dig on the last week of August, but as Perter has suggested there are other suitable times.
When Tony Tickle was in Australia this year, and he is a world renowned expert on hawthorn, he did suggest the method mentioned below, but it could be that the extra heat is not needed in Australia. We have dug some small and very large ones with a success rate of around 80% so probably that is not too bad.
Tony's blog is worth a read.

https://yamadori.co.uk/tag/black-bag/
Watto
Aussie Bonsai Fan
Aussie Bonsai Fan
 
Posts: 2297
Joined: July 6th, 2009, 8:17 am
Location: Goulburn
Favorite Species: Plum
Bonsai Age:
Bonsai Club: Goulburn Bonsai Society

Re: Crataegus (Hawthorn)

Postby melbrackstone » November 20th, 2017, 9:07 am

Thanks for the link Watto, very interesting info there!
User avatar
melbrackstone
Aussie Bonsai Fan
Aussie Bonsai Fan
 
Posts: 1164
Joined: December 15th, 2015, 8:05 pm
Location: Brisbane
Favorite Species: Willow leaf fig
Bonsai Age: 5
Bonsai Club: Bonsai Society of Qld

Re: Crataegus (Hawthorn)

Postby SueBee » November 20th, 2017, 9:35 am

I have to admit I abused the roots a bit in the getting it out from beside the septic tank.There are several small shoots/branches and some shoots on the root too so I have laid it raft style with branches facing up in a training pot.Time will tell.
Thank you for that link Watto - very informative....and inspiring!
Last edited by SueBee on November 20th, 2017, 10:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
Thanks for Sharing
SueBee

If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Marcus Tullius Cicero
SueBee
Aussie Bonsai Fan
Aussie Bonsai Fan
 
Posts: 85
Images: 35
Joined: November 7th, 2017, 11:54 am
Location: South Western Victoria
Favorite Species: Maple
Bonsai Age: 2
Bonsai Club: Always Learning via Net, Reading & practice.


Return to Evergreen

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No Members and 1 guest