twisted shimpaku junipers

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Re: twisted shimpaku junipers

Postby shibui » May 15th, 2018, 7:33 pm

Thanks for your observations Stormfyre. I'm sure this style is not to everyone's taste, especially Australians where we are not exposed to really harsh conditions. I may even have missed the subtle nuances of this sort of tree but I'm hoping that each successive try will get better.

Have you had any deep wire scars? And how have you dealt with this?
I try to avoid wire scars 8-) and have not had any worth worrying about. On one larger cascade where I split the trunk, wrapped, wired and bent I dis get a little swelling above and below the binding but I was aware of the potential so unwound before it got bad. Unfortunately the split has still not fully healed as a result of early unbinding but I think that's better than swelling.

Dealing with wire scars:
It is sometimes possible to grow them out but with slow to heal species like juniper it can take a while. You'd need to allow the tree to grow freely for a few years to get enough thickening to grow over the scars.

Turn a fault into a feature - would it be possible to strip bark to form a shari following the wire scar up the trunk? Following wire marks could look a little artificial as the marks are probably quite evenly spaced but it may be possible to take the shari off the wire marks in places to introduce some randomness.

Make other scars - I have started to thicken some other species in specific places by cutting through the bark in places where the trunk/branch needs some extra thickening. The scar tissue that forms adds extra bulk to the tree at that place but not elsewhere. Maybe similar scarring could disguise or cover up the wire marks you have?
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Re: twisted shimpaku junipers

Postby Mbunro » May 16th, 2018, 11:22 am

thanks for the detailed response shibui!

i plan to grow on the few iv started for at least 2 more years maybe more, so hopefully the buldges grow out as you suggest. Being squamata they seem to thicken allot quicker than shimpaku too so hopefully this will be all they need.
they all have twisted sacrifice branches below any of the major swelling too so this should help also. i think the shari idea would have been good when the scars were fresh and fleshy, but they have mostly healed over now just in a very unattractive way. on the plus side though i ended up with a large scar on the inside of the first bend on one of my smaller trunks (maybe 1cm thick now) and the swelling has caused the bend to start fusing already.

will think about trying raffia and maybe some thinner wire for the next batch though and make sure to remove the wires earlier.
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Re: twisted shimpaku junipers

Postby Watto » May 16th, 2018, 4:29 pm

Shibui, I forgot to ask what Joe thought of your tree. As it is his "fault" that you started this venture his opinion would be interesting.
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Re: twisted shimpaku junipers

Postby shibui » May 16th, 2018, 9:21 pm

I can't say that he was outwardly enthusiastic Watto, but then again I have not actually seen him overly excited about anything else either. He just took it all in his stride and made the best of the material presented a susual.

MB: I'm not sure what bearing the freshness or age of scars has on the possibility of shari. I have not seen your tree but I don't think the age of scars would impact on that sort of procedure.
Removing wire is the only way I know to prevent making. As mentioned earlier wrapping wiith raffia just causes swelling at the top and bottom of the wrap and I also ended up with one tree with raffia impressions in the bark after leaving it on too long. I have noticed that thinner wire seems to cut in quicker than thicker. Maybe due to thinner wire being easier to apply so it is closer against the trunk? Possibly just the surface area against the trunk is smaller so bites more easily?
I have found that the thin junipers I bend are set after just a month or so though some bends are weak after removing the wire that the trunk can collapse when supporting wire is taken off. I usually leave the wires on and just keep regular check and remove at the first sign of wire pressing into the bark anywhere on the tree.
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Re: twisted shimpaku junipers

Postby loyskirineba » May 17th, 2018, 12:34 am

Love those twisted shimpaku. Great job Shibui! I just wish that they thicken quicker :) but then again at least it gives us more available time to concentrate on other trees while waiting :yes:
“Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet.”
― Aristotle
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Re: twisted shimpaku junipers

Postby Jow » May 18th, 2018, 10:05 am

shibui wrote:I can't say that he was outwardly enthusiastic Watto, but then again I have not actually seen him overly excited about anything else either. He just took it all in his stride and made the best of the material presented a susual.


Hi Neil,

I think they are great! Material such as this simply isn't available in this country unless you grow it yourself.

I think you will agree that you have been learning a lot about how to make this material over the years and the results are beginning to show! The trees that you brought along were all interesting and unique material which i would make room for on my own benches if given half the chance.

I think that the smaller more twisted/knotted tree we styled in particular will become an excellent tree as it develops in years to come.

Joe
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Re: twisted shimpaku junipers

Postby shibui » May 18th, 2018, 6:22 pm

There you have it Watto, from the horse's mouth :D

Thanks Joe for the positive feedback. As you say, each time I do this I seem to discover more of the nuances of developing this type of stock. Unfortunately results, and improvement are quite slow coming because these are so slow to grow and thicken. Every few days I go out to check, hoping that some have thickened up enough to go to the next stage :fc: and each time I'm disappointed to find they have not :x
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