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new roots to enhance nebari

PostPosted: July 18th, 2013, 6:49 pm
by shibui
Some trees just do not have roots in all the places you really want them. There are a number of ways to get roots to grow where you need some. These first pics are of apprach grafting seedlings to add roots to a trident maple.
approach graft roots 1.JPG

The seedlings were approach grafted at the end of last winter.
approach graft roots 2.JPG
approach graft roots 3.JPG

Time to see what has happened. First step, comb out the roots and wash them off a bit.
approach graft roots 5.JPG
approach graft roots 6.JPG

One of the seedlings at the back and the one at the side have not joined up with the trunk so I'm trying again. Remove bark on the trunk and on the seedling and put them together again, this time nailed on a bit more securely.
approach graft roots 7.JPG

The other seedlings that appear to have joined ok are cut back to get the new roots to feed the tree and join up even better. you can see I've left stubs until I'm sure the roots are actually feeding the tree. The 2nd from the left joined up quickly and was cut back earlier so it is time to reduce the stub and start the scar healing over.
approach graft roots 8.JPG

Re: new roots to enhance nebari

PostPosted: July 18th, 2013, 6:59 pm
by Josh
Nice progression, thanks for sharing. That's a nice looking tree too. You have some really nice stock. Looking forward to seeing how these roots develope and look in another growing season.

Josh.

Re: new roots to enhance nebari

PostPosted: July 18th, 2013, 7:13 pm
by Webos
Gday Shibui,
How much would a piece of stock like this cost?

Thanks

Adam

Re: new roots to enhance nebari

PostPosted: July 19th, 2013, 7:43 pm
by shibui
I have no idea Adam. I'm not interested in selling this one just at the moment - at least until I see how it turns out.

Re: new roots to enhance nebari

PostPosted: July 19th, 2013, 7:54 pm
by Damian Bee
Hi Shibui,
Can I ask?? What have you used to attach the approach grafts??

Re: new roots to enhance nebari

PostPosted: July 19th, 2013, 8:20 pm
by shibui
Here's another way to get new roots to enhance nebari.
This trident triple trunk had good surface roots on 3 sides.
repot trident triple 10.JPG

but lacked good surface roots on the left
repot trident triple 07.JPG

I removed a strip of bark where I wanted new roots to grow and applied rooting compound
repot trident triple 09.JPG

and covered the wound with spagnum moss after the tree was repotted
repot trident triple 13.JPG


Here is the result this winter
repot trident triple 2013 7 c new roots.JPG

I think this might be a better way to add roots. Although the roots are initially smaller there is no scar where the trunks of the seedlings were cut (approach grafted seedlings above) so the new roots will blend in with the existing trunka and nebari more quickly. Many of you will be aware that this technique is similar to the toothpick techinque that has been shown in other threads.

Re: new roots to enhance nebari

PostPosted: July 19th, 2013, 8:26 pm
by shibui
Can I ask?? What have you used to attach the approach grafts??

Most of those seedlings are nailed onto the trunk Damian. I tried map pins but the heads pop off too easy. Small flathead nails hold the seedlings close to the trunk while the cuts heal and (hopefully) unite. I found it is necessary to drill a hole through the seedling for the nail or they split and the nail(s) will not hold them tight - use the smallest drill bit you can get. I have also used wood staples that straddle the seedling to hold them in place. whatever you use it must hold the seedling in close contact with the trunk or the callus that forms will just push the seedling away from the trunk and they do not unite.

Re: new roots to enhance nebari

PostPosted: July 19th, 2013, 9:58 pm
by Shane Martin
shibui wrote:Here's another way to get new roots to enhance nebari.
This trident triple trunk had good surface roots on 3 sides.
repot trident triple 10.JPG

but lacked good surface roots on the left
repot trident triple 07.JPG

I removed a strip of bark where I wanted new roots to grow and applied rooting compound
repot trident triple 09.JPG

and covered the wound with spagnum moss after the tree was repotted
repot trident triple 13.JPG


Here is the result this winter
repot trident triple 2013 7 c new roots.JPG

I think this might be a better way to add roots. Although the roots are initially smaller there is no scar where the trunks of the seedlings were cut (approach grafted seedlings above) so the new roots will blend in with the existing trunka and nebari more quickly. Many of you will be aware that this technique is similar to the toothpick techinque that has been shown in other threads.

Shibui,
I have tried this technique to the letter a few times without success, in that the strip of removed bark just keeps wanting to callous over, rather than grow roots.... Any clues as to what I might be doing wrong?

Re: new roots to enhance nebari

PostPosted: July 20th, 2013, 7:50 pm
by shibui
If you have done all the above but still got no roots my guess would be moisture levels around the site. That's why I used the spagnum moss and actually covered that with another layer of potting mix to keep it moist. The area is so close to the surface it would be easy for it to dry out and few trees would want to grow roots in dry soil.
Was it trident maple you tried this on? Many other species do not produce new roots quite as easily. I think that is the intent of the toothpicks in toothpick method - to stop the wounds healing quickly therefore giving more time for roots to start. Maybe some other innovative way to stop the cuts healing over can be found?
Sometimes I have found that despite trying everything a tree just won't respond - that's where grafting is a surer technique.

Re: new roots to enhance nebari

PostPosted: July 22nd, 2016, 9:57 pm
by Pearcy001
shibui wrote:Here's another way to get new roots to enhance nebari.
This trident triple trunk had good surface roots on 3 sides.
repot trident triple 10.JPG

but lacked good surface roots on the left
repot trident triple 07.JPG

I removed a strip of bark where I wanted new roots to grow and applied rooting compound
repot trident triple 09.JPG

and covered the wound with spagnum moss after the tree was repotted
repot trident triple 13.JPG


Here is the result this winter
repot trident triple 2013 7 c new roots.JPG

I think this might be a better way to add roots. Although the roots are initially smaller there is no scar where the trunks of the seedlings were cut (approach grafted seedlings above) so the new roots will blend in with the existing trunka and nebari more quickly. Many of you will be aware that this technique is similar to the toothpick techinque that has been shown in other threads.


Hi Neil,

Been going over some old posts tonight and wondering if you can confirm / clarify for me, in regards to the second technique of removing the bark.

When removing the bark did you remove it all the way down to the heartwood? Or just to the cambium layer? Also wondering if you have found this technique to give consistent results?

Cheers,
Pearcy.

Sent from my SM-G920I using Tapatalk

Re: new roots to enhance nebari

PostPosted: July 24th, 2016, 10:09 am
by shibui
When removing the bark did you remove it all the way down to the heartwood? Or just to the cambium layer? Also wondering if you have found this technique to give consistent results?

Think of this as a modified layer. If the cambium is left there is a good chance that it will just produce bark to seal up the wound before roots can form so it is best to remove all cambium like we do when layering. The roots will grow from the callus that forms from the cambium layer at the top of the cut.
1. Remove bark. Remember that roots will form from the UPPER side of the cut so place your cut so the top is where you want your roots.
2. Scrape to remove as much cambium as possible. If the trunk is fluted or has hollows that are hard to access no need to be too pedantic. Roots should still form from the scarped areas and you probably don't need wall to wall roots anyway.
3. Apply rooting hormone.
4. Cover the area with sphagnum or good potting mix. Needs to be covered well enough that the area won't get too dry while roots are starting.
5 :fc: and wait.

No technique is 100%. Success will depend on things like: species; climate; weather; nutrients and water levels; time of year; etc. I have not had reason to use this technique many times. I've done it 3 or 4 times with trident maples and it has done well each time. It would be good to hear of experiences from other growers to get a wider appreciation of how this works/ does not work and the circumstances.

Re: new roots to enhance nebari

PostPosted: July 24th, 2016, 10:22 am
by melbrackstone
Really appreciate the time you put into your explanations and help, Neil, thank you!

Re: new roots to enhance nebari

PostPosted: July 24th, 2016, 10:32 am
by Pearcy001
Thanks for the explanation Neil!

Cheers,
Pearcy.

Sent from my SM-G920I using Tapatalk

Re: new roots to enhance nebari

PostPosted: July 24th, 2016, 4:24 pm
by Andrew Legg
Something I find useful for root grafts is upholstery pins. The type they use on leather couches. They are quite long and they have a nice big head. I cut a small piece of bicycle inner tube and knock them in through that. The rubber just protects the small tree a little.
Cheers,
Andrew