Native seeds

Discussions about propagating from cuttings, seeds, air layers etc. Going on a dig (Yamadori) or thinking of importing? Discuss how, when and where here.
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quodlibet_ens
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Native seeds

Post by quodlibet_ens » February 9th, 2020, 10:17 am

I was thinking of getting some seeds to start growing natives for bonsai. Pictured is what I was thinking of. Anyone got tips on what they have experience with in terms of germination and training as bonsai? Are there any I should avoid altogether?

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Re: Native seeds

Post by Keels » February 9th, 2020, 11:09 am

I've only grown callistemons and Casuarinas from seed. What I find is that you can start the bending and twisting the seedlings just after the first 12 months. That way they still flexible for tight bends etc. Good luck.
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Re: Native seeds

Post by shibui » February 9th, 2020, 11:10 am

That's a good list. Some I have never grown.
Acacia seed normally requires scarification to get good germination. Either scratch each seed on concrete or sandpaper or easier to put the seed in a cup and pour boiling water over to crack the seed coat. Allow to soak overnight then pour off the water and sow as usual.

Some of those Tassie conifers may need stratification - cold treatment, either in the fridge for a few weeks or if your area is cold enough just sow and leave the pots outside over winter and let nature do the work.

Snow gum may also grow better after stratification. Other eucs usually germinate well without any treatment. Cider gum has not survived for long here.
Lepto, mel and kunzea seed is very small like dust. Just sprinkle it on the surface and water very gently to wash seed into the cracks in the potting mix or spread a very thin layer of vermiculite or seed raising mix over the seed. Most germinate quickly but grow slow for the first months.
http://shibuibonsai.com.au/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

quodlibet_ens
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Re: Native seeds

Post by quodlibet_ens » February 9th, 2020, 11:40 am

shibui wrote:That's a good list. Some I have never grown.
Acacia seed normally requires scarification to get good germination. Either scratch each seed on concrete or sandpaper or easier to put the seed in a cup and pour boiling water over to crack the seed coat. Allow to soak overnight then pour off the water and sow as usual.

Some of those Tassie conifers may need stratification - cold treatment, either in the fridge for a few weeks or if your area is cold enough just sow and leave the pots outside over winter and let nature do the work.

Snow gum may also grow better after stratification. Other eucs usually germinate well without any treatment. Cider gum has not survived for long here.
Lepto, mel and kunzea seed is very small like dust. Just sprinkle it on the surface and water very gently to wash seed into the cracks in the potting mix or spread a very thin layer of vermiculite or seed raising mix over the seed. Most germinate quickly but grow slow for the first months.
I have had a little trouble with conifers in the past, but I'm hoping to correct some mistakes this time around.

I'd really love to turn this into a side project that could pay for itself in the future. I've always found Aussie natives to be inspiring species for bonsai and would love to see more of them being trained.

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Re: Native seeds

Post by shibui » February 9th, 2020, 3:31 pm

I've always found Aussie natives to be inspiring species for bonsai and would love to see more of them being trained.
Hear hear :clap: :clap:
http://shibuibonsai.com.au/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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