Mi Bonsai olivo

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afassiversus10
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Mi Bonsai olivo

Post by afassiversus10 »

Que vos parece tiene futuro o no?ImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImage

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shibui
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Re: Mi Bonsai olivo

Post by shibui »

Welcome to Ausbonsai. Most of us are from Australia but quite a few grow olives as they grow as weeds in many areas here so we have the opportunity to dig up older trees with thick trunks.
I do not have any Spanish. The translate app I used tells me you ask if the olive has a future.
All trees have a future. It just depends what result you want and how long you are willing to spend.
Olives grow slowly as bonsai so it will take many years for this little tree to become a spectacular old olive trunk but you can have a small tree in just a few years. Feed and water as needed and trim long shoots to make the canopy bushy.
Small pots tend to slow the growth of most plants so you can speed up the process by growing it in a larger pot for a few years but if you are happy to go slower just keep it in the pot.
http://shibuibonsai.com.au/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
afassiversus10
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Re: Mi Bonsai olivo

Post by afassiversus10 »

shibui wrote:Welcome to Ausbonsai. Most of us are from Australia but quite a few grow olives as they grow as weeds in many areas here so we have the opportunity to dig up older trees with thick trunks.
I do not have any Spanish. The translate app I used tells me you ask if the olive has a future.
All trees have a future. It just depends what result you want and how long you are willing to spend.
Olives grow slowly as bonsai so it will take many years for this little tree to become a spectacular old olive trunk but you can have a small tree in just a few years. Feed and water as needed and trim long shoots to make the canopy bushy.
Small pots tend to slow the growth of most plants so you can speed up the process by growing it in a larger pot for a few years but if you are happy to go slower just keep it in the pot.
hello, good pleasure, I did not know that olive trees existed in Australia, but from what I see that yes, thanks for the advice, surely you mean that I could transplant it to a larger pot then? good thanks and another question how do you see this little tree?

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shibui
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Re: Mi Bonsai olivo

Post by shibui »

Your tree appears to be healthy and happy but it is very young so it does not give the feeling of a large, old olive tree - yet.
Part of bonsai is for viewers to see and feel the essence of a large, old tree somewhere in nature. It takes years for a small tree to develop maturity to make it seem like an old tree.

Here is one of my olive bonsai. It was collected from a friend's farm near here.
IMGP9833.JPG
I hope this one looks more like an old tree. The branching is starting to look more realistic.

Those new to bonsai are often surprised to find that we rarely grow our trees from seed or little seedlings as that takes many years. Many of the most impressive trees are developed from older trees that have been collected from fields, forest or mountains.
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afassiversus10
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Re: Mi Bonsai olivo

Post by afassiversus10 »

shibui wrote:Your tree appears to be healthy and happy but it is very young so it does not give the feeling of a large, old olive tree - yet.
Part of bonsai is for viewers to see and feel the essence of a large, old tree somewhere in nature. It takes years for a small tree to develop maturity to make it seem like an old tree.

Here is one of my olive bonsai. It was collected from a friend's farm near here.
IMGP9833.JPG
I hope this one looks more like an old tree. The branching is starting to look more realistic.

Those new to bonsai are often surprised to find that we rarely grow our trees from seed or little seedlings as that takes many years. Many of the most impressive trees are developed from older trees that have been collected from fields, forest or mountains.
Thank you very much for the information, this little tree is years away from appearing in a bonsai. yours already looks like a very old tree and it's good that you can collect trees from mother nature and transplant them to the pot, I wish I could do it, since first I don't know what guidelines I should follow to be able to collect a tree from the forest.

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shibui
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Re: Mi Bonsai olivo

Post by shibui »

Yes, it is very different when the trees you want to collect are native. Here olive is a weed so it is easy to get permission to take trees. I had my eye on some growing on the road reserve near where I live but our local government shire council recently sprayed them with herbicide so I'm too late to get those.
If you do ever get the chance to take some wild olives they are very easy to transplant. They will survive with very little root and can be transplanted all year round down here with no problems.

Not sure of the prices but there are now nurseries in southern Europe that specialize in older and larger olives because many people want to have an iconic olive at home. I guess that most are transplanted.

In the meantime let yours grow and develop. They grow more and faster if planted into a larger pot or in the garden. You can transplant any time of year if just potting up into larger pot and not removing many roots. They seem to do better when root pruned when it is warmer so late spring through summer are favored time to do any root work.
Don't be frightened to just enjoy your little olive as it is. Just trim long shoots to promote a bushy little tree and enjoy it as is.
http://shibuibonsai.com.au/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
afassiversus10
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Re: Mi Bonsai olivo

Post by afassiversus10 »

shibui wrote:Yes, it is very different when the trees you want to collect are native. Here olive is a weed so it is easy to get permission to take trees. I had my eye on some growing on the road reserve near where I live but our local government shire council recently sprayed them with herbicide so I'm too late to get those.
If you do ever get the chance to take some wild olives they are very easy to transplant. They will survive with very little root and can be transplanted all year round down here with no problems.

Not sure of the prices but there are now nurseries in southern Europe that specialize in older and larger olives because many people want to have an iconic olive at home. I guess that most are transplanted.

In the meantime let yours grow and develop. They grow more and faster if planted into a larger pot or in the garden. You can transplant any time of year if just potting up into larger pot and not removing many roots. They seem to do better when root pruned when it is warmer so late spring through summer are favored time to do any root work.
Don't be frightened to just enjoy your little olive as it is. Just trim long shoots to promote a bushy little tree and enjoy it as is.
Thank you friend, it is seen that you are very good at this world of bonsai. well look here wild trees also grow or especially pines, but the problem is that I don't know the technique of transplating them, that is, the way you do it, Don't you have any video of any of your work? What is needed to collect them? And what are the guidelines that I have to follow to be able to recover a tree from the mountain and turn it into a tree. in the pot


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shibui
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Re: Mi Bonsai olivo

Post by shibui »

Sorry. I am not too good with the technology so I have not done any videos of collecting techniques. Some of the posts on my Shibui Bonsai blog should have tips and photos of transplanting techniques. https://shibuibonsai.com.au/

Exact techniques vary from one type of tree to another but some general guidelines include:
Deciduous trees are generally easier to transplant than conifers.
For most types of trees spring seems to be a good time of year to transplant.
After transplant most trees need at least a year to recover, sometimes several years, before we can do the real styling work.
http://shibuibonsai.com.au/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
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