About admin

Hi, my name is Greg Watson but just about everyone calls me Watto. The nickname comes from my sporting life and my work. I have been active in bonsai for more than 20 years, but the level of activity has been determined by how much time I had to devote. Work and sport did take me away from this fine art on and off over the years but I have always come back. I am a lover of decidious trees, both flowering and non-flowering, and I am particually interested in trees that are dug from either the wild or from gardens. I believe I should firstly ensure dug trees grow and prosper and then try to enhance the beauty that Mother Nature has given each plant. Not change them too much, but just highlight the beauty that Mother Nature has started. I have a collection that is too big (probably over 100 trees) and a passion for bonsai pots that my darling wife calls "worrying". Of course if you have trees, you need pots - its that simple. I am a member of the Goulburn Bonsai Society Inc and a member of the Ausbonsai family. I really enjoy getting out and looking at bonsai, talking about bonsai and being engulfed by the bonsai spirit. I hope you enjoy my trees.

Leptospermum

I think this is called the prickly tea tree from memory, but my memory isn’t that good. I bought this with a number of other tube stock Australian natives from a nursery in Tumut about ten years ago, so this tree has been pot grown for its whole life. Again, I hope one day it will be part of an Australian native shohin display at an exhibition. Love the flaking bark and the tiny flowers. Has been trouble free so I hope it continues along those lines.

Eucalyptus

I dug this tree a while ago so I don’t know what variety it is unfortunately. I decided to dig it just because it had some trunk movement which appealed to me as most gums have a relatively straight trunk, at least the ones I see in the wild. I wasn’t good at keeping records of this tree so I don’t know when it was dug but it would be at least 4 years. I have made a new pot for this tree and I will repot it this year.

Alpine Bottlebrush

I recently joined the Victorian Native Bonsai Club and this was following the AABC convention conducted by the club that featured only Australian native plants as bonsai and to say the least I was hooked. I have had an interest for some time but this exhibition really excited me in what can be done. To celebrate my acceptance into the club I thought I should post a few of my Australian natives just in case other members have a look at this blog. Hopefully I will post one every week for a while (it won’t take too long to get through all of them as I don’t have a great number).

This Callistemon pityoides was purchased as tube stock some years ago and has always been pot grown. It grows well in the conditions here and has flowered for the past few years. It is currently in a Pat Kennedy pot that is a bit too big for it but at the next repot a further reduction in pot size will occur.

This photo was taken at night with a flash and that accounts for “different” coloring.

A Spruce Bites the Dust

Its not quite winter yet but the wind has been blowing a gale, its raining (sideways) and its freezing cold. That’s all the ingredients necessary for a bonsai to be blown off the bench and that is what happened.

The spruce that hit the deck was due for a repot this spring but this early in the season is not what it needed.

This is how I found it this morning

It was in an old Japanese pot and needed one slightly larger but alas I haven’t got another Japanese pot so during the emergency repot it was placed into a Chinese pot as a temporary measure. I hope that in the spring (the proper repotting time) I can slip it out of its temporary home and put it in a new home more in keeping with the tree.

It needs better alignment in the pot and hopefully when spring comes I can manage that.

Old Japanese pots are difficult to find now so if I’m looking a bit sad, that’s the reason. Looking on the bright side, no branch damage to the tree so now it gets a little rest before the next intervention.